Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
How to stop your skype IP from getting resolved NEW METHOD!
#1
1. Go to "Tools" on skype
2. Go to "options"
3. Go to "advanced" Then Connection
4. At the bottom it will say "Allow direct connections to your contacts only"
5. Check the box
6. Restart Skype
7. Wait up to 12hrs
8. Laugh at people when they cant get your IP through skype Big Grin
Reply
#2
Interesting, great share man, thanks! I thought Skype patched this :/
Do NOT PM me for any inquiries related to advertising on PacketPunks. 

For our change log, CLICK HERE.
For our help docs, CLICK HERE.
Reply
#3
(03-19-2014, 12:33 AM)Schultz Wrote: Interesting, great share man, thanks! I thought Skype patched this :/

They patch it every update and in between updates a TON however the people who find bugs in the system and get IPs still find ways to bypass it and get peoples IP however, with this method it just shows microsofts IP and not yours.
Reply
#4
Interesting...

I'm assuming Skype is using SIP to form the sessions, and from there it's just point to point RTP packets using some arbitrary codec (G.711, G.729, whatever). Assuming Skype is MITM'ing the session, they would need to have massive application layer gateways which handle the SIP session setup and teardown between two or more hosts... which means they would need to be re-writing diversion headers, among other values.

So is it that Skype is creating a socket connection when you're in a call between your system and the remote host to pass the RTP audio packets? And if it's establishing video, I'm guessing that's going to be using h.225 / h.320 / h.323 ? In theory, it would be highly inefficient to pass that content direct to Skype before it's sent to the remote host. Perhaps if their IP transit pipes are fucking massive would they be able to support that with minimal latency.

How does one currently grab an IP of someone on Skype? Is it as simple as a netstat -b ?

Zane
Reply
#5
(03-19-2014, 06:30 AM)Mr. Zane Wrote: Interesting...

I'm assuming Skype is using SIP to form the sessions, and from there it's just point to point RTP packets using some arbitrary codec (G.711, G.729, whatever). Assuming Skype is MITM'ing the session, they would need to have massive application layer gateways which handle the SIP session setup and teardown between two or more hosts... which means they would need to be re-writing diversion headers, among other values.

So is it that Skype is creating a socket connection when you're in a call between your system and the remote host to pass the RTP audio packets? And if it's establishing video, I'm guessing that's going to be using h.225 / h.320 / h.323 ? In theory, it would be highly inefficient to pass that content direct to Skype before it's sent to the remote host. Perhaps if their IP transit pipes are fucking massive would they be able to support that with minimal latency.

How does one currently grab an IP of someone on Skype? Is it as simple as a netstat -b ?

Zane

Interestig analogy Zane.

I always thought skype was based on some kind of open P2P infastructure, the pipelines required for the amount of bandwidth they use would be phenemoal alone, let alone managing it, security in place, latency & protecting it.

I believe they nuked P2P or did something to prevent skype resolving.
Do NOT PM me for any inquiries related to advertising on PacketPunks. 

For our change log, CLICK HERE.
For our help docs, CLICK HERE.
Reply
#6
(03-19-2014, 06:39 AM)Schultz Wrote:
(03-19-2014, 06:30 AM)Mr. Zane Wrote: Interesting...

I'm assuming Skype is using SIP to form the sessions, and from there it's just point to point RTP packets using some arbitrary codec (G.711, G.729, whatever). Assuming Skype is MITM'ing the session, they would need to have massive application layer gateways which handle the SIP session setup and teardown between two or more hosts... which means they would need to be re-writing diversion headers, among other values.

So is it that Skype is creating a socket connection when you're in a call between your system and the remote host to pass the RTP audio packets? And if it's establishing video, I'm guessing that's going to be using h.225 / h.320 / h.323 ? In theory, it would be highly inefficient to pass that content direct to Skype before it's sent to the remote host. Perhaps if their IP transit pipes are fucking massive would they be able to support that with minimal latency.

How does one currently grab an IP of someone on Skype? Is it as simple as a netstat -b ?

Zane

Interestig analogy Zane.

I always thought skype was based on some kind of open P2P infastructure, the pipelines required for the amount of bandwidth they use would be phenemoal alone, let alone managing it, security in place, latency & protecting it.

I believe they nuked P2P or did something to prevent skype resolving.


Gimme 20 mins and I'll test it Big Grin

Yep. The call is negotiated between Skype servers and the client, and once the codec can be negotiated and session established, it is backhauled through various IP SIP carriers. When I called Synth, I saw my traffic egressing AS13285 (http://bgp.he.net/AS13285 ).

Looks like all your calls be belonging to the NSA.
Reply
#7
This works for those resolvers that call your skype to try and get your IP. Great share.
Reply
#8
(03-19-2014, 06:30 AM)Mr. Zane Wrote: Interesting...

I'm assuming Skype is using SIP to form the sessions, and from there it's just point to point RTP packets using some arbitrary codec (G.711, G.729, whatever). Assuming Skype is MITM'ing the session, they would need to have massive application layer gateways which handle the SIP session setup and teardown between two or more hosts... which means they would need to be re-writing diversion headers, among other values.

So is it that Skype is creating a socket connection when you're in a call between your system and the remote host to pass the RTP audio packets? And if it's establishing video, I'm guessing that's going to be using h.225 / h.320 / h.323 ? In theory, it would be highly inefficient to pass that content direct to Skype before it's sent to the remote host. Perhaps if their IP transit pipes are fucking massive would they be able to support that with minimal latency.

How does one currently grab an IP of someone on Skype? Is it as simple as a netstat -b ?

Zane

Holy crap, look at the amount of technical jargon Confusedurprised:

Best regards,
-Siberia
PacketPunks
Knowledge talks, wisdom listens.
PM me with any questions or comments
Reply
#9
I used to use this method tho, I thought it was patched also.
But I will try it later, and repost.

Anyway, thanks for sharing this!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)